Capital One v. Peck and Gilliam v. Bank of America — Unraveling the Ancient Mysteries Behind Contemporary “Standing” Disputes in Foreclosure Courts

Your Host: Attorney Gary Victor Dubin
with
Co-Host:  Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee 

Foreclosure Workshop #61: Capital One v. Peck and Gilliam v. Bank of America — Unraveling the Ancient Mysteries Behind Contemporary “Standing” Disputes in Foreclosure Courts

For centuries, one of the most important yet confusing concepts in American Law has been that of the “standing” of a party to pursue claims and defenses in court.

Without “standing,” claims and defenses will be dismissed in court, which makes “standing” one of the most powerful weapons in foreclosure litigation especially.

Foreclosure defense concepts by themselves have traditionally remained confusing enough, as our listeners know, varying from jurisdiction to Continue reading

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How Much “Bias” and “Stand Down” Was Ordered Concerning the TBTF Banks During 2008-2016?

By Sydney Sullivan, Co-Editor and Contributing Researcher

An interesting post by Richard Bowen on June 21, 2018, The DOJ report: Another Political Hot Potato? brings up very significant questions.

Mr. Bowen writes, “Department of Justice (DOJ) has yet to prosecute any of the major players responsible for the 2008 financial crisis. I think we need to ask if bias was responsible here as well.”

Hopefully, folks are following “[T]he Justice Department’s report on the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email scandal and other actions in advance of the 2016 election is already a political hot potato,” as Mr. Bowen begins his post.

“The report has President Trump supporters saying “Told ya so” and the general public questioning how the DOJ and the FBI runs its departments. And rightfully so. Continue reading

Paragraph 22, The Notice of Default and Right To Cure: How To Use This Most Overlooked Foreclosure Defense To Defeat Summary Judgment and Win at Trial

Your Host: Attorney Gary Victor Dubin
with
Co-Host:  Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee 

(Foreclosure Workshop #16: Rebroadcast from July 17, 2016)

This important broadcast, first exclusively airing on The Foreclosure Hour on July 17, 2016, is being repeated because homeowners are still largely under-using this powerful weapon against foreclosure, given the sloppiness and dishonesty of loan servicers, although it is available in virtually every mortgage and deed of trust situation.

John Waihee and I are pleased to have heard from many of our listeners that since that first Continue reading

Does a Different Statute of Limitations Apply to the Enforcement of Mortgages than to the Enforcement of Notes?

WELCOME TO THE FORECLOSURE HOUR

Your weekly national foreclosure talk show.
Listen in. Call in. Make your voice heard.

Rebroadcast of October 15, 2017 – Gary Dubin
Co-Host: John Waihee
Foreclosure Workshop #48:
Kipuhulu Sugar Co. v. Nakila — Does a Different Statute of Limitations
Apply to the Enforcement of Mortgages than to the Enforcement of Notes?

Continue reading

How to Create an Entirely New Financial System on the People’s Terms

“For a city to create its own public bank owned by the People and accountable directly to them, is to create an entirely new financial system on the People’s terms, which is the logical end-game of divestment. …

“By bringing banking under public control, so that the bankers that have the responsibility over our financial sector are accountable public servants rather than private casino gamblers, we can finally make progress towards a system that is legitimately, rather than superficially democratic.” Continue reading

“It’s the Rules of Evidence — Stupid” (Part Two): 10 More Ways To Avoid Being Blindsided by Dishonest Foreclosure Attorneys

Your Host: Attorney Gary Victor Dubin
with
Co-Host:  Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee 

For decades State and Federal Courts throughout the United States have been robotically applying one set of evidence rules to foreclosure cases and another set of evidence rules to all other civil cases.

Those who have been listening to our radio show know why, because the Courts until recently have applied the traditional mortgage lending model of the neighborhood banker, oblivious to how the hidden secondary securitized trust banking system works. Continue reading

It feels like State and Federal Legislators don’t have a Clue about what real-life Americans Face Every Day

By Sydney Sullivan

The Hawaii legislature in 2018 started off wanting to make it a “Felony” if you rented a room in your home short term without the required licensing. Most folks are all for the necessary permit and, of course, paying the taxes. But making a vacation rental violation a felony – well, that went a bit too far.

Sometimes it feels like state and federal legislators don’t have a clue about what real-life Americans face every day. Legislators have always had a paycheck, even during the 2008 meltdown. While many folks were losing their homes, banks offered sweet refinance and payoff deals to legislators all over the country. Average homeowners couldn’t get a refinance or modification from 2008 through 2012 because the banks told them to miss 3 payments to qualify for HAMP and then denied homeowners the opportunity to reinstate their loan – because they were unknowingly in DEFAULT. Continue reading

Congratulations, You Defeated Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment, But Do You Know The Ten Things You Need To Do Next?

Sunday, April 8, 2018 – 3 PM HST
Upcoming Discussion for Sunday’s THE FORECLOSURE HOUR
Sundays: 3 pm (HST) Click HERE to listen.

Homeowners in growing numbers lately, even pro se, have suddenly been defeating summary judgment in foreclosure proceedings or securing appellate reversals of prior summary judgments remanded for trial.

As our listeners know, there are many foolproof ways of challenging the validity of default notices, general loan ledgers, and ownership of promissory notes at filing inception, which we have addressed on prior shows, one or more usually sufficient to defeat summary judgments once you know how easily it can be done, depending of course always on how knowledgeable your foreclosure Judge is. Continue reading

US Bank v. Arizumi — 15 Defects To Look For When Analyzing and Defeating a Foreclosing Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment

Sunday, February 11, 2018 – 3 PM HST
Upcoming Discussion for Sunday’s THE FORECLOSURE HOUR
Sundays: 3 pm (HST) / 5 pm (PST) / 8 pm (EST). Click HERE to listen.

Foreclosure Workshop #54: US Bank v. Arizumi — 15 Defects To Look For When Analyzing and Defeating a Foreclosing Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment
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The main event in any judicial foreclosure is the summary judgment hearing in which a foreclosing plaintiff attempts to convince the court that it should immediately prevail and your property should be sold at auction, since it argues there is no need for a trial as it owns your mortgage debt, you are in default, and it is entitled to foreclose.

By defeating summary judgment, the odds of saving one’s home improve greatly as a borrower can thereafter generally look forward to securing either finally an attractive loan modification, a significant discounted payoff, or in rare cases wiping out one’s mortgage debt entirely. Continue reading

It’s the Rules of Evidence Stupid: 25 Ways in Which Foreclosure Attorneys Are Knowingly Committing Fraud on Our State and Federal Courts

Sunday, February 4, 2018 – 3 PM HST
(Rebroadcast from June 14, 2015 – Its Super Bowl Sunday – everybody deserves a day off now and then)
Upcoming Discussion for Sunday’s THE FORECLOSURE HOUR
Sundays: 3 pm (HST) / 5 pm (PST) / 8 pm (EST). Click HERE to listen.
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Not very long ago lenders filing foreclosure actions merely went into court filing affidavits that a borrower was behind in mortgage payments, offering into evidence virtually no specific documentation, not even a loan payment accounting known as the “loan general ledger.”

Notwithstanding whatever evidentiary challenges borrowers might have made previously, unlike in other areas of American Law, foreclosure judges would merely take a foreclosing plaintiff’s printed word for it. Continue reading