Fraud: An American History from Barnum to Madoff

CREDIT SLIPS Email:

ej-fraudNot a moment too soon, Princeton University Press has just released Fraud: An American History from Barnum to Madoff by historian & Duke University Vice Provost Ed Balleisen. (Some readers might be familiar with his earlier book on bankruptcy in Antibellum America).

As I learned when reviewing an earlier draft, Fraud is meticulously researched and completely fascinating, with plenty of careful attention to law and regulatory structures. The book’s other virtues are well encapsulated by Kirkus:

Balleisen casts a gimlet eye on the passing parade of hucksters and charlatans, peppering a narrative long on theory with juicy asides that build toward a comprehensive catalog of ‘Old Swindles in New Jargon’. . . . Ranging among the disciplines of history, economics, and psychology, Balleisen constructs a sturdy narrative of the many ways in which we have fallen prey to the swindler, and continue to do so, as well as of how American society and its institutions have tried to build protections against the con. But these protections eventually run up against accusations of violating ‘longstanding principles of due process,’ since the bigger the con, the more lawyers arrayed behind it.Kirkus Continue reading

Non-Traditional Mortgages Appeal to Hawaii’s Highest Court

hear-yeeThis Sunday The Foreclosure Hour shared the appellate process with listeners to help them better understand the complexity of the court system.

Last month (September 2016) the Hawaii Supreme Court heard attorney Gary Dubin argue on behalf of a Ewa Beach, Hawaii resident who was sued for foreclosure by “U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, in trust for the registered holders of MASTR Asset Backed Securities Trust 2005-NC1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-NC1,” a securitized REMIC trust.

The Plaintiff, like so many others, claimed (and the lower Circuit Court penned in the Findings of Fact) it “is now the Holder of the Note.” Of course, there were the usual series of “after-the-fact” robo-signed assignments trying to establish the right to enforce, and an allonge dated “after-the-fact” signed in blank. Even a witness who was basically a computer jockey viewing screen shots with no personal knowledge of who or how the data was entered.  But in this case, there is a bit of a twist which, it appears, the Justices were picking up on as they asked astute questions about the procedure and the original (now bankrupt and liquidated) lender, New Century Mortgage Corporation. Continue reading

Foreclosure Hour – Surviving in an Inconsistent Legal System

Upcoming Discussion for Sunday’s THE FORECLOSURE HOUR
Sundays: 3 pm (HST) / 6 pm (PST) / 9 pm (EST). Click HERE to listen.

What Every Homeowner Needs To Know About the Latest Foreclosure Trends and Developments in American Law in Order To Survive in an Inconsistent Legal System Largely Out of Service Which Treats Like Cases Differently.

all-the-justice-money-can-buyIt is a natural law of Justice in virtually every legal system in the history of the world that “like cases should be treated alike,” except it seems in the field of foreclosure defense in America where national inconsistency has become the norm.

Thus, for nearly a tumultuous decade following (the continuation of) the Mortgage Crisis of 2008, American Courts have created a record of contradiction, confusion, and uncertainty, ignoring established rules of evidence and even its own case precedents governing other areas of the law, while often pompously looking the other way in the tradition of Pontius Palate, routinely favoring lenders, often misusing the doctrine of stare decisis to protect previously egregiously mistaken case precedents. Continue reading

When The Economy Crashes There Will Be A Reallocation Of Money Not A Reset!

An Interview and Email with Bix Weir – RoadtoRoota.com

Continue reading

Is the Hawaii Supreme Court Preparing to Lead the Way to a More Equitable Judicial Foreclosure Approach in Hawaii – Again Leading the Nation?

Upcoming Discussion for Sunday’s THE FORECLOSURE HOUR
Sundays:  3 pm (HST) / 6 pm (PST) / 9 pm (EST). Click HERE to listen.

Foreclosure Workshop #19: Bank of America v. Reyes-Toledo, A Case Study on How To Get Appellate Courts To Ask the Correct Questions

fORECLOSURE FIASCOFor too long homeowners and their counsel have allowed themselves in court to be drawn into and sidetracked by mainly esoteric and artificial, unsuccessful arguments about REMIC tax structures, multi-hat robosigners, and invisible securitized trusts — without getting to the heart of the most important foreclosure defense issues in court.

This Sunday we are airing on The Foreclosure Hour an oral argument that took place on certiorari before the Hawaii Supreme Court on August 18, 2016, heard by five Justices, each intelligent, each free from Big Bank influences, who are beginning to ask the correct questions. Continue reading

Do you want a National Mortgage Registry system?

Over 72 million families (based on 2.5 per household – that’s 180,000,000 constituents) have been negatively affected by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. and its parent company MERScorp Holdings, Inc. Too many to count foreclosures have resulted over the past decade with forged assignments documents allegedly signed by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (MERS) employees who actually work for someone other than MERS.

Many of the homeowners who have bought a home or refinanced a home since 2002 will find Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. listed as the “nominee” mortgagee in their mortgages – and they don’t even know it. Now, the federal government is proposing a “National” mortgage registry system – and one would have to wonder why?

Please consider voting your opinion. 

What Happened on Wall St. Ahead of the Crisis? We May Yet Find Out

New York Times
Street Scene
WILLIAM D. COHAN

db-streetscene-master768The eighth anniversary of the 2008 financial crisis is almost upon us, making this as good a moment as any to take stock of how little we know still about the bad behavior and deception that occurred inside the big Wall Street banks that helped to cause it — and how little we may ever know.

A wave of settlements between Wall Street and the Justice Department and regulators resulted in fines in excess of $200 billion flowing from the shareholders of these firms into the coffers of the various federal and state government entities. These payments still feel to me more like extortion than justice. After all, if the prosecutorial arm of the federal government that regulates you demands a 10- or 11-figure payment, it seems pointless to argue. Continue reading

Securities Fraud: In Search of the Holy Grail of Foreclosure Defense

Upcoming Discussion for THE FORECLOSURE HOUR
Sundays:  3 pm (HST) / 6 pm (PST) / 9 pm (EST). Click HERE to listen.

7-28-2016 Homeownership CensusHomeownership in the United States has fallen to 62.9%, the lowest rate since such statistics were kept beginning in 1965. And that rate is expected to fall below 50% in the coming decades — and the statistics are even far worse for America’s minorities.
Homeowners’ rights have meanwhile been virtually ignored by the American political and legal systems, as evident by little discussion by either national political candidates today.

And yet a flood of even more irrational judicial decisions has been seen this year, which we will discuss on this Sunday’s Foreclosure Hour radio show, by federal and big-state courts protecting pretender lenders, with virtually no real relief for defrauded homeowners yet in sight who are left to beg for loan modifications, another largely dishonest and emotionally humiliating process. Continue reading

The Securitization Debacle – A U.S. Pension Shortfall: $3.4 Trillion+ [$3,400,000,000,000]

By Sydney Sullivan

looting the pension fundsShortfall. Unfunded. Underfunding. Sounds like a minimal pension issue – however, it is anything but that. You may have heard the words “shortfall” when your state refers to it’s government budget or pension plan; and, if you are young (say, under 40), you’ve probably not given it a second thought. Just so you know “shortfall” is defined as “a failure to come up to expectation or need” and at 40 it seems like there will be plenty of time and ways to make up a shortfall… not so much when you are 60.

If you’re like many Americans, you’re worried about retirement. Maybe before the new century securitization scheme was launched, a “shortfall” might have been more easily explained and handled. But after 2000, the Wall Street securities system ramped up and took deficits to a new high while lining the pockets of Wall Street traders. How did this happen? Continue reading