Four Fraud-Busting Citizens Initiate a Plan to Hold the Elite Financial Leaders Accountable and Prevent Further Economic Damage

By Sydney Sullivan

celebrate-whistleblowers-600Four astounding men, Gary Aguirre, Bill Black, Richard Bowen, and Michael Winston, are the founding members of the Bank Whistleblowers United. These well-educated men have the moral integrity and intelligence to see the damage Wall Street has caused and have devised a plan to prevent or at least reduce the frequency and harm of future economic crises.

We, as American citizens, know we have not recovered from the 2008 economic crisis as our present administration and Congressional leaders would like for us to believe. Although lots of warriors have stepped up to battle the banks, none have been as united or noteworthy as these four financial fraud-busting astronauts, venturing into a red banking hole existing in cyberspace which has been an arduous climb up-Hill (pun intended) to penetrate, decipher …and even more difficult to correct.  Continue reading

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In Corporate Crimes, Individual Accountability Is Elusive

20stewart-web-articleLargeBrandon L. Garrett is a specialist in corporate prosecution at the University of Virginia law school and author of the recent book “Too Big to Jail.”  By Khue Bui for The New York Times

“We have never hesitated to investigate and prosecute any individual, institution or organization that attempted to exploit our markets and take advantage of the American people,” Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. proclaimed this month when the Justice Department announced that Standard & Poor’s, the ratings agency, had agreed to pay $1.375 billion to settle civil charges that it inflated ratings on mortgage-backed securities at the heart of the financial crisis. Continue reading

Stern Words for Wall Street’s Watchdogs, From a Judge

In the New York Times – By Published: December 16, 2013

NTBTGTJWASHINGTON — It used to be common for the federal government to prosecute prominent people responsible for debacles that rattled the financial system. Michael R. Milken, the junk bond artist, went to prison in 1991; Charles H. Keating Jr., the face of the savings-and-loan crisis, pleaded guilty to four counts of fraud in 1999; and it looks like Jeffrey K. Skilling, the former chief executive of Enron, will be in prison until 2017. Continue reading

Little to NO Sympathy for Big Banks – New York Times

By 

NYT no sympathyIt’s no fun to be a banker these days. It is not just the increased regulation. It’s the lack of trust.

“At what point does this stop?” asked Gary Lynch, the former director of enforcement for the Securities and Exchange Commission who has gone on to jobs with many leading Wall Street firms and is now global general counsel at Bank of America.

He was referring to the escalation in penalties being levied on banks, culminating in the $13 billion JPMorgan Chase was forced to pay for a series of transgressions. Continue reading

While you were Trick or Treating – so were the Banks on Capitol Hill

While you were tacking on the last sequins of the Halloween costume and watching the World Series – the banks were handing out cash for votes to scale back the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform law. You probably didn’t hear about it because after that the TSA shooter dominated the news. Another special from “Whaddah I miss?”

s_500_opednews_com_0_financial-derivative-jpg_56223_20130104-458The U.S. House of Representatives voted last Wednesday to scale back a much-debated provision of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform law, handing bank lobbyists a token victory in their fight against the tougher rules. The much-debated provision centered around derivatives. Those fighting the foreclosure wars need not be told the “devil is in the derivatives.” Continue reading

Weekend Reading: Calm Before the Storm

The New York Times with an insightful review.

stuck_in_customs2WEEK IN REVIEW NOVEMBER 1, 2013  BY ERIC OWLES

[Editors’ note: Please do not read this if you are a junior banker at Goldman Sachs.]

Sit back and enjoy eating your children’s Halloween candy. Looking ahead to next week, we face possible settlements for JPMorgan Chase and Steven Cohen’s hedge fund as well as Twitter’s initial public offering. Continue reading

CREDIT SLIPS – Crisis Books… a phenomenal resource

Credit Slips logo

Crisis books  posted by Alan White

I recently stumbled on this excellent compendium of more than 300 books on the financial crisis.  It also includes a list of 25 or so books that predicted the crisis, as well as a useful link to an annotated list of individuals who can be given credit for predicting various aspects of the crisis. [This is terrific reference material. Be sure to bookmark. DC Ed.] Continue reading

Money Is Not Safe In The Big Banks

Under the Dodd-Frank Act “losses will be assigned to shareholders and unsecured creditors. …as a depositor in a bank, under the law –
YOU ARE an unsecured creditor.”

banker_debt_web“The Leveraged Buyout of America” by , Author, Web of Debt, Public Bank Solution; President, Public Banking Institute

Giant bank holding companies now own airports, toll roads, and ports; control power plants; and store and hoard vast quantities of commodities of all sorts.

They are systematically buying up or gaining control of the essential lifelines of the economy. How have they pulled this off, and where have they gotten the money? Continue reading

Wall Street Shows Its Ass Again

Why Wall Street & Co. Will Do Anything to Stop Eliot Spitzer from Championing the Public Interest

wall-street-bullWeb of Debt blog / By Ellen Brown
The latest post from the AlterNet
Spitzer as comptroller: Good for New York, good for women, terrifying for Wall Street abusers.

Before Eliot Spitzer’s infamous resignation as governor of New York in March 2008, he was one of our fiercest champions against Wall Street corruption, in a state that had some of the toughest legislation for controlling the banks. It may not be a coincidence that the revelation of his indiscretions with a high-priced call girl came less than a month after he published a bold editorial in the 
Washington Post titled “ Predatory Lenders’ Partner in Crime: How the Bush Administration Stopped the States from Stepping in to Help Consumers.”  The editorial Continue reading