U.S. Bank v. Jewel Moore — Learn from Jewel Moore Live How She Was Victimized by the Foreclosure System in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii and What Her Case Teaches Us About the Reforms in the Foreclosure System That Are Desperately Needed

Your Host: Attorney Gary Victor Dubin
with
Co-Host:  Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee 

For years, following the Mortgage Crisis of 2008, lenders have been fined by regulators nearly one-half-trillion dollars, if not more, for admittedly submitting fraudulent loan documentation under oath in foreclosure cases in state and federal courts.

And more recently a growing number of state and federal judges have understandably denied lenders summary judgment where their supporting foreclosure documents have either been in violation of the rules of evidence or suspiciously or outright fraudulent.

Yet, despite all such welcome, albeit belated, official leadership, the legal system, including its appellate courts, have woefully lacked Continue reading

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A Review and Analysis of Some of the Most Noteworthy July 2018 Judicial Decisions

Your Host: Attorney Gary Victor Dubin
with
Co-Host:  Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee 

Judges everywhere are beginning to rethink past judicial decisions in the foreclosure area as it becomes more and more evident that fraud and deception have predominated behind the scenes in foreclosure cases nationwide.

This rethinking has led to a growing number of monthly attempts by more and more state and federal court judges, albeit as yet too few, to give more attention to their foreclosure cases.

This past month, for instance, a number of noteworthy judicial decisions both at the trial level and on appeal have been handed down potentially generating new foreclosure defenses in several state and federal jurisdictions that our listeners need to know about and Continue reading

Capital One v. Peck and Gilliam v. Bank of America — Unraveling the Ancient Mysteries Behind Contemporary “Standing” Disputes in Foreclosure Courts

Your Host: Attorney Gary Victor Dubin
with
Co-Host:  Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee 

Foreclosure Workshop #61: Capital One v. Peck and Gilliam v. Bank of America — Unraveling the Ancient Mysteries Behind Contemporary “Standing” Disputes in Foreclosure Courts

For centuries, one of the most important yet confusing concepts in American Law has been that of the “standing” of a party to pursue claims and defenses in court.

Without “standing,” claims and defenses will be dismissed in court, which makes “standing” one of the most powerful weapons in foreclosure litigation especially.

Foreclosure defense concepts by themselves have traditionally remained confusing enough, as our listeners know, varying from jurisdiction to Continue reading

The Rise and Fall of Securitized Trusts: Eleven Future Strategies To Dismantle Them in Their Retreat

Your Host: Attorney Gary Victor Dubin
with
Co-Host:  Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee 

At first, securitized trusts received obedient kowtowing from the American Judiciary, unwittingly deceived by, if nothing else, their long impressive titles including in their names the names of otherwise past respected financial institutions supposedly acting as their trustees.

And when securitized trusts, starting with the mortgage crisis of 2008, began their unending wave of foreclosures, they did so exclusively as mortgagees, since state foreclosure laws have always been written to exclusively authorize foreclosures on traditional mortgages only and not in favor of the holders of promissory notes. Continue reading

Paragraph 22, The Notice of Default and Right To Cure: How To Use This Most Overlooked Foreclosure Defense To Defeat Summary Judgment and Win at Trial

Your Host: Attorney Gary Victor Dubin
with
Co-Host:  Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee 

(Foreclosure Workshop #16: Rebroadcast from July 17, 2016)

This important broadcast, first exclusively airing on The Foreclosure Hour on July 17, 2016, is being repeated because homeowners are still largely under-using this powerful weapon against foreclosure, given the sloppiness and dishonesty of loan servicers, although it is available in virtually every mortgage and deed of trust situation.

John Waihee and I are pleased to have heard from many of our listeners that since that first Continue reading

Does a Different Statute of Limitations Apply to the Enforcement of Mortgages than to the Enforcement of Notes?

WELCOME TO THE FORECLOSURE HOUR

Your weekly national foreclosure talk show.
Listen in. Call in. Make your voice heard.

Rebroadcast of October 15, 2017 – Gary Dubin
Co-Host: John Waihee
Foreclosure Workshop #48:
Kipuhulu Sugar Co. v. Nakila — Does a Different Statute of Limitations
Apply to the Enforcement of Mortgages than to the Enforcement of Notes?

Continue reading

“It’s the Rules of Evidence — Stupid” (Part Two): 10 More Ways To Avoid Being Blindsided by Dishonest Foreclosure Attorneys

Your Host: Attorney Gary Victor Dubin
with
Co-Host:  Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee 

For decades State and Federal Courts throughout the United States have been robotically applying one set of evidence rules to foreclosure cases and another set of evidence rules to all other civil cases.

Those who have been listening to our radio show know why, because the Courts until recently have applied the traditional mortgage lending model of the neighborhood banker, oblivious to how the hidden secondary securitized trust banking system works. Continue reading

Foreclosure Workshop #57: LCP-Maui vs. Tucker — What Every Homeowner Facing Foreclosure Needs To Know About Deficiency Judgments

Your Host: Attorney Gary Victor Dubin
with
Co-Host:  Former Hawaii Governor John D. Waihee 

In most States, as one of the most vicious aspects of the foreclosure system, if the auction sale price is not enough to pay off the balance of a loan, the lender or its collection agency assignee is entitled to a deficiency money judgment.

Deficiency collection can then consist of aggressively garnishing wages, seizing bank accounts, and foreclosing on a borrower’s other real property if any, forcing many borrowers into bankruptcy, further increasing the emotional trauma and financial loss due to being foreclosed on. Continue reading

Congratulations, You Defeated Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment, But Do You Know The Ten Things You Need To Do Next?

Sunday, April 8, 2018 – 3 PM HST
Upcoming Discussion for Sunday’s THE FORECLOSURE HOUR
Sundays: 3 pm (HST) Click HERE to listen.

Homeowners in growing numbers lately, even pro se, have suddenly been defeating summary judgment in foreclosure proceedings or securing appellate reversals of prior summary judgments remanded for trial.

As our listeners know, there are many foolproof ways of challenging the validity of default notices, general loan ledgers, and ownership of promissory notes at filing inception, which we have addressed on prior shows, one or more usually sufficient to defeat summary judgments once you know how easily it can be done, depending of course always on how knowledgeable your foreclosure Judge is. Continue reading

US Bank v. Arizumi — 15 Defects To Look For When Analyzing and Defeating a Foreclosing Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment

Sunday, February 11, 2018 – 3 PM HST
Upcoming Discussion for Sunday’s THE FORECLOSURE HOUR
Sundays: 3 pm (HST) / 5 pm (PST) / 8 pm (EST). Click HERE to listen.

Foreclosure Workshop #54: US Bank v. Arizumi — 15 Defects To Look For When Analyzing and Defeating a Foreclosing Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment
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The main event in any judicial foreclosure is the summary judgment hearing in which a foreclosing plaintiff attempts to convince the court that it should immediately prevail and your property should be sold at auction, since it argues there is no need for a trial as it owns your mortgage debt, you are in default, and it is entitled to foreclose.

By defeating summary judgment, the odds of saving one’s home improve greatly as a borrower can thereafter generally look forward to securing either finally an attractive loan modification, a significant discounted payoff, or in rare cases wiping out one’s mortgage debt entirely. Continue reading